Fantasy Trilogy Published

The Children of Light Trilogy LaunchedBundle

After weeks of work and tearing out of hair, the revisions and new covers,
it’s finally finished. The eBook is available free on Amazon until March 16.

Send me an email to request a free copy
of The Children of Light Trilogy
in exchange for a Review

Description

Felindra has a unique gift; she can communicate with animals. She’s a Whisperer.

In Book One, she is a thirteen-year-old girl living peacefully with her family in the Duchy of Trethawynd. When the duchy is attacked by the Dark Brethren, her family is forced to leave home and travel to the Monastery of The League of Light where her father is the Commander of the League Defenders.

On the journey, she befriends an injured female wolf. The pair become inseparable partners in the war to defeat the Dark Brethren.

In Book Two, seven years have passed. Just as she has finished her education and started working as a teacher at the Monastery, she receives a summons from the Queen of Albasiny who wants her to go to the island Kingdom of Motu Ataahua in the tropics of the Southern Ocean They need her skills to help discover why animals are dying and the sea creatures have disappeared from the surrounding ocean.

Expecting to solve the problem in months and return to Albasiny, they are delayed when the situation becomes more serious than they’d expected. When their defender is killed, she and her companions realize that this is more than a local disease; Dark Magic is involved. Renewed conflict with the Dark Brethren leads Felindra and her companions being carried far from the Islands and Albasiny.

Book Three is about their escape from war-torn Basrind and their hazardous journey across the continent of Utrea. They travel through numerous countries, through forest and deserts, and over mountain ranges. After being attacked by bandits, and escaping from a ruthless anti-witchcraft shah, they struggle on, hoping to reach a port where they can catch a ship back to their home in Trethawynd, Albasiny.

How it began

Choosing Names

Before I started writing fantasy, I used to give the characters I liked names that I liked, Claire, Andrew, Celeste, Julia, etc.  Villains and unpleasant people got names I didn’t like. With fantasy it became more complex.

First I decided on the region of an earth-like world in which to set the story and chose the Mediterranean (semi-tropical with dark-skinned people). Then I searched for ancient Persian names and adopted some of those for my characters, Daryan and Parvana, for example.

The northern part of the country, the Duchy of ValkonenMaa, was settled by people from sub-arctic islands, so I chose to use Finnish names for them. Many of the place-names are also based in Finnish words. (Word recognized this and offered me a Finnish dictionary).

In the second and third books, I used my name book, Names of the World, to find Polynesian, Middle-Eastern, and Himalayan names.

I made up many of the names, Felindra for example. Her name had a noticeable (to me) influence on her developing personality. The Duchy in which Felindra lives is called Trethawynd. In the town where I live, there’s a road called Trethewey that I found rather intriguing but it wasn’t quite right for me, so I adapted it to fit.

I seem to have a bias against names with G in them, because I often invent such names for villains: Barengush, Gremulkin, Ogren.

Whether writing Science Fiction or Fantasy, I refuse to use unpronounceable names. like Phlgsh.

How do other writers choose character names?

 

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